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Posts Tagged ‘writers’

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To put it bluntly: if you’re known, it’s easier to promote and sell your work. It’s a fact that JK Rowling sells more books than Tess Gerritsen, even though in my humble opinion JKR has nothing on Tess. But Ms Rowling gets a lot more publicity and that helps her secure that “Richest Writer in the Universe” spot. Any wanna-be writer who takes their writing seriously should make sure they get as much publicity and interact with as many people as possible. All of them could be potential readers of your books.

The question is how to achieve as much visibility as possible, while still maintaining your regular job, proper contact with your family and still writing your novels. Well I would say good time management skills, ability to prioritize and coffee, but I don’t want to sound like one of those people always giving lectures on business management.

Instead I want to give you ideas of where to start and how in small steps get people to like you and care about your work.

Web site

I feel like stating the obvious. Every writer who is serious about their work should have their own web site.

It’s a place where people can learn some basic information about you (often listed in “About” or “Bio” page) like when did you start writing, why do you like it so much and so on. It helps you establish that, in fact and contrary to a popular belief, you are a human being with a passion.

And when you finally publish your work, your web site is where your readers can easily find all your works no matter how many different publishers you have. I know writers who publish their books with four different publishers and if reader were to follow them to a publisher, they would miss out on all the books published with someone else.

Blog

Nothing helps you to connect like a blog. Regular posts about your life, funny anecdotes, complaints about the recent problems you have with your characters… Blogging can be about everything. Not only you keep writing (and that as we know helps to keep the writer’s block away) but blogging is also a great way of meeting new people and finding friends.

It’s good to blog for the sole purpose of blogging, though. Because if you blog with a secret agenda of selling your books, or ideas or anything, it will soon because an exhausting errand or worse, your readers will realize that your passion is somewhat fake.

Remember it’s okay to create a post “OMG! I got published LOOK!” and put up a link in the sidebar. However mentioning at the end of every post “see this book I wrote buy and review PLZ!” is simply annoying. Not to mention bordering on Spam. That won’t help you start friendly relationships with people who later on could support you and help you solve your plot problems.

Forums

Personally, I find forums overwhelming and slightly chaotic. But that’s because I prefer cozy, little groups of people who know each other well. But I’m a minimalist and prefer to have few small circles of friends than one huge group of people. However even with my personal preferences, I can’t deny, that forums are simply irreplaceable when it comes to establishing visibility for a writer. I experienced the magic when before NaNoWriMo 2007 I posted on their forums a link to my Random Prompt Generator.

If you like the format forums offer before posting, you should pay extra attention to both your profile and your signature. You should use both with caution. Don’t overdo it; there is such thing as “too much”. You’d be surprised how far you’ll get by simply placing a link to your website/blog/newest book. If people like what you write in your posts to the forums, they will follow the link and you don’t need a huge banner there.

Network sites

You know, MySpace, Facebook, StumbleUpon, and Digg. Places where you can friend people, exchange comments and basically have fun. Though I wouldn’t recommend signing up with all of them. That would make you lose your mind. But one or two (preferably ones you are already using) will help to get your name out there.

Remember

Don’t overwhelm yourself. You want to get some exposure online to promote your future work. It can’t take over your life, nor should it take you away from your writing. Self-promotion is something you can do at any given time. So you should make sure you have your priorities straight. Your writing comes first.

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This is a post for those who already wrote a novel. Or are looking for ideas that currently sell. For those still working on their books, this is something you might want to use for future reference.

Here’s a list of Publishers who specilize mostly in online publishing. If you’re just starting, the world of e-books is much easier to conquere than that of real books. And as a plus, some ePublishers decide to publish their best authors in paperback. So why don’t you take a look at those names and see if you have a chance to get your work out there.

Atlantic Bridge Publishing offers 45% royalties. Paranormal, Fantasy, Romance, Horror, Sci/fi, Adventure, Mystery, Western, Historical, Mainstream, Young Adult, Children Books as well as Non-Fiction and Poetry. Submission guidelines.

Chageling Press pays 35% royalties. They publish Interludes and Novellas (up to 25000 words a piece) and concentrate mostly on Fantasy and Erotica. Submision Information.

Dead End Street Publications accepts fiction, non-fiction and screeplays. FAQ.

DLSIJ Press publishes mostly women writers and offers up to 45% royalties. They publish all kinds of genres both Fiction and Non-Fiction. Call for Submissions.

Echelon Press accepts all kinds of genres for their ebook section and if you meet their requirements you can have a shot at publishing a paperback with them. Guidelines.

ENC Press publishes “novels for grown-ups” that aren’t completely pollitically correct. Check here for details.

Fictionwise accepts only already published authors, but if you qualify you might as well check them out.

Flame Books is currently closed for submissions, however they promise to start accepting new work later this year. Stay tuned if you want to publish with them.

Loose Id specilized in erotica and romance with emphasis on alternative lifestyles. They offer 35% royalties. They also publish some of their contracted authors in print. Check the submission guidelines here.

Lulu.com is for those who don’t want to send out their cover letters and wait for some publishing house to decide they like what you write. They offer a complex service for everybody who wishes to publish themselves.

New Concepts Publishing publishes mostly romances, however you should give their submission guidelines a chance as you might find something for you there.

Samhain Publishing is always open to general submissions of all genres of romance and erotica, but if you’re writing in a different field you can check out their submissions page as they update it quite often (unlike some other publishing houses). They pay 40% of cover price for single ebook.

Torquere Press publishes only books about GLBT characters with strong romance overtones (although they do have a sistersite for heterosexual romances too). They offer from 25% to 35% royalties. Here are their submission guidelines.

Writer’s Exchange E-publishing Author will receive 60% of the retail download price if Author provided the work complete. If Writers Exchange E-Publishing is required to complete any cover-art on the Author’s behalf the royalties to the Author will drop to 50% to allow 10% to be paid to the cover artist. For illustrated books the author royalties will drop to 40% to allow 20% to the cover artist. Check here for details.

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1. Ten Things That May Indicate You’re Writing a McNovel – it’s almost like a Mary Sue test for the whole novel

2. Internet-Resources.com – Writers’ resources on the web

3. NotWriting – stuff one writer does when he should be writing

4. Notebook in Hand – mingle with other writers in forums

5. Storyist – software for writers with Macs. Makes you want to buy a MacBook

6. Seventh Sanctum Generators – Random fun for those who need inspiration

7. Story Spinner Online – gazillions creative writing exercises

8. Fiction Factor – online magazine for fiction writers

9. 10 Things to Write in Your Notebook

10. A Dozen Online Writing Tips – written by a journalist but also useful to other writers

11. BBC Get Writing – mini-courses to improve your writing

12. Writerisms and other Sins – A Writer’s Shortcut to Stronger Writing

13. Language is a virus – huge resource page originally designed to help you with NaNoWriMo

14. Writing-World.com – impressive list of articles on how to write a good novel

15. 50 tools which can help you in writing – lifehack’s take on the subject

16. Writer’s Resource Center – targeted at US writers

17. TOC about Writing – serious and humorous articles from sci-fi and fantasy writers

18. National Punctuation Day – mark your calendars

19. Creativity at Work – quotes

20. Cliche Finder – pick a word and the site will find all cliches using that word

21. Writers Online Workshops – Instructions on how to improve your writing whithin weeks

22. SoYouWanna – how to publish a book

23. Gnooks! – find new reading material

24. Common Errors in English

25. Guerrilla Press – free independent publishing resource site

26. Word Perhect – a new way of writing

27. Hit Those Keys – site for creative encouragement.

28. NewPages.com – News, information and guides to independent bookstores, independent publishers, literary magazines, alternative periodicals, independent record labels, alternative newsweeklies and more

29. 110+ Resources For Creative Minds – List of must-visit sites and articles

30. BetterEditor.org – online resources for editors and writers

31. Wikimedia Foundation – Links to all official Wiki sites

32. The Care and Feeding of Writers – funny approach to little quircks typical for writers

33. Non-errors – Those usages people keep telling you are wrong but which are actually standard in English

34. Dictionary of British slang – for those non-British authors who wish to use Brits as their characters

35. Q10 – Free Word Editor for writers.

36. One Sentence – true stories, told in one sentence

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I discovered Writing.com right before the NaNoWriMo started. And let me tell you. It was a huge mistake. Because right now I’m spending every moment I have going through stuff posted there. I read new material and review each and every posted item.

While I have to admit that the site is a bit confusing at first, but after reading few helpful articles provided by the staff, I managed to get comfy there.

I have to tell you upfront. The site is a bit addictive, but great when it comes to getting feedback. The authors will be thrilled by the ammount of constructive criticism they can get there.

Here is my portfolio, if anyone’s interested. I have to admit that during the November insanity there is no way I will be posting any of my writing there. BUT! Afterwards? I will definitely consider it. So should you if you have anything in your drawer you’d like to share or improve. Because that’s the beauty of Writing.com. You can update any posted item.

I’m giving Writing.com 5/5 points. Any writer or hardcore reader should at least check out the site.

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